Operations

Ryan Fischer

Your first hire doesn’t need to be a rockstar

Nov. 15, 2017

Rockstar - let’s add that to the list of buzz words that I’m not a fan of. So many people I speak to always look for their first hire to be extraordinary and impactful. And I’m not going to say that is wrong. But I have a different opinion on what makes extraordinary and impactful.

For a startup and pretty much 90% of the development jobs, to have an impact that person should

be able to deliver

Delivery and execution are some of the most important factors for being successful. You’ll find the majority of what you need done may not be that complex - it requires time and thought but it is not a perplexing puzzle.. The project just needs to continue to move forward.

be pragmatic

This is critical for launching projects and features in a timely fashion. Sometimes the “right” answer is not actually the right answer. The absolute correct solution may take 32-60 hours, but the pretty darn close enough answer will take 30 minutes - no joke. Convert time to money, and you have $5,000 or $50 and also launching faster. And of course, the future tech debt still needs to be evaluated.

have experience

Computer Science degrees and/or having a big named company on your resume does not dictate experience. I’ll take the person who has played a role in launching projects for teams for a few years over a fancy resume.

be solution-oriented

You won’t ever find someone who has the answers. You want a person who approaches a problem by looking for a solution. A key sign of that is taking a problem and breaking that problem into smaller ones that are more manageable.

At the end of the day, most development does not require some crazy smart algorithmic rocket science person. The field that needs that is… rocket science. Find a pragmatic problem-solving developer who can show with experience that they deliver and you’ll be shipping in no time.

Ryan Fischer

What People Are Reading

Operations

8/1/16

Good Founders Make Good Clients - 5 Traits We Look For

“Ideas are easy. Implementation is hard.” – Guy Kawasaki

As a development agency that primarily works with early stage startups, we hear all kinds of business ideas. You could even say that we're in the business of building business ideas; but only one's we believe will succeed, and not on our own. We know that, without a good founder to drive implementation, even the best ideas will surely fail. In fact, most give up at the first sign of real challenge, and their ideas never see the light of day. So while we spend time evaluating the viability of the idea, we must also consider if the founder has what it takes. Here are the 5 traits we look for:

1. Tenacious belief. Some traits can be learned or honed; this is not one of them. Startups are inherently difficult, demanding, and full of unknowns and disappointment. To make it through, a founder needs confidence, determination, passion, and the like - things you can't have without first believing. We're not talking about simply believing you have a good idea. We're also not talking about blind belief to the point of delusion. This is believing strongly enough in your vision that, despite the uncertainties and inevitable struggles in your path, you will do whatever it takes to see it through.

2. Domain expertise. Serious founders need to understand their market as much as possible. Ideally, you can directly relate to the problem you're trying to solve - or - you have extensive experience that gives you insight on your target market. Even then, the best founders do everything they can to consistently learn and absorb new information.

3. Communication. The greatest entrepreneurs are masters of communication. Not all start out that way, but its something to be conscious of and constantly improve. A good founder has the ability to communicate clearly, confidently, and candidly. They can clearly explain their thoughts and ideas. They use confidence to sell themselves and their vision, as well as to lead others. They can candidly express their feelings, while maintaining control of their emotions.

4. Head in the clouds, feet on the ground. Growing a startup requires constant innovation. A good founder has vision; they dream big and consistently ask themselves, "what's next?" However, that vision will never materialize unless a founder can execute in the present. A good founder can keep their eyes to the future while practicing self awareness, focus, patience, and responsible decision making.

5. Flexibility. The survival of a business, like in nature, depends on its ability to adapt. No matter how much a founder plans, new information will arise and circumstances will change; a good founder is prepared and willing to respond. Some changes will inevitably result in failures. A founder must have the resilience to pick themselves up, learn from the failures, and push on.

6. Enjoys the ride. I know I said 5 traits, but this one's pretty important too. Yes, starting a business is difficult, risky, blah blah blah...but what's the point if you can't enjoy it? Having fun will not only make your life (feel) easier; attracting advocates, customers, employees, and investors will be easier as well.

Now these aren't the ONLY things a founder needs to build a successful business, nor do they guarantee success, but we'd bet on you. So if you have a great idea and "what it takes" (see above), we should meet.

News

10/18/17

ChangeMaker Launches!

In a world where marches and protests are making weekly headlines, people are always looking for the next cause to get behind.

But what do you do when a cause or issue you’re passionate about needs more awareness and support? How do you find people to come together? How do you organize people, activities, events, and whatever else you might need to do? And if you do find people, how do you manage all the different moving parts?

And, well, what does that have to do with us at 20spokes?

Meet ChangeMaker -- a project we recently completed and launched.

Similar to sites like Kickstarter or Indiegogo, ChangeMaker allows organizations to add a project and find fellow activists to donate to or join the cause as a volunteer. The interface provides organizations the ability to detail an issue or problem, outline a solution, and how donors or volunteers can help. When people join the project as a volunteer, they can specify their particular skillset in fields such as marketing, design, legal, or data so project managers can delegate tasks to the right people.

With funding from donations, users can work on projects for their cause by using the free website. While most project management tools have some sort of fancy, pay-to-use features, ChangeMaker is completely free to use because it is donor funded and donor maintained.

We branded, designed, and coded the ChangeMaker platform in a Rails environment. We also integrated Stripe Connect, which enables organizations to receive those donations they need to power their projects.

Putting all this together sounds like it would take a good chunk of time, right? But we kicked off this project on August 8 and launched the website this week. A little more than two months. Not too shabby, eh? Just in time for the Newfounders Conference. ChangeMaker will have a big presence at the conference with donors ready to help out organizations that have ready-to-pitch projects for its demo night. Nothing is too small or too large for ChangeMaker to help its users and organizations tackle.

Give ChangeMaker a whirl at changemaker.newfounders.us.

Technology

1/6/17

React Lessons for Newcomers

At 20spokes, developers spend a roughly equal amount of time between Ruby on Rails and React. While we enjoy working in both frameworks, they are quite different in approach, and going from a Rails way of thinking to a React way of thinking can be an adjustment.

One major way in which these frameworks are different is that Rails takes care of a lot of architectural issues that React leaves open for interpretation. Coming from a Rails background, I found the openness of React to be a bit anxiety-inducing at first, but I've come to really embrace it, because it's forced me to think more carefully than ever about how other developers would approach my code.

As a team, we've also considered what our best practices should be towards React, as we all want to make our code understandable and friendly to anyone who encounters it. To that end, below is a (growing) list of our approaches to making our React projects not only maintainable, but enjoyable to work with.

Be relentless with components

The basic building block of React is the component. To those new to React, they can best be thought of as modules.

As a developer, I start to get nervous when I see large components that perform various functions. The solution to keeping your files short and sweet is to take every opportunity to break your objects into re-useable components. Having larger components may not seem like a big deal when starting a project from scratch, but if you relentlessly component-ize you'll thank yourself as your project grows.

There are some code smells to recognize when you should create new components. If you see lots of groups of markup within a single div, those groups should probably be their own component.

If we have lots of renderXXX functions within in one component that render more markup, that's usually a code-smell that whatever is being returned from those functions should be their own component.

Make components as reusable as possible by passing dynamic data as props.

Privilege functional components over class-based ones

In many cases, it's overkill to Use React's Component class for every component you create. Not all components need access to the Lifecycle Methods or local state that Component provides. Start with stateless functional components and turn them into React Component instances as needed.

Take advantage of PropTypes

We started the practice of listing out PropTypes at the bottom of every component, so other developers can quickly reference what props are needed or optional. Oftentimes, we'd investigate what data we should expect in a component by looking up examples of that component elsewhere in the codebase. This easily can be avoided by using PropTypes, which provide a quick way to see what data is being passed, and of what type that data should be. Here's an example from our reusable Button component:

Button.propTypes = {  
  text: PropTypes.string.isRequired,
  onPress: PropTypes.func.isRequired,
  disabled: PropTypes.bool,
  icon: PropTypes.string,
}

We're pointing this out because, while Facebook already notes it as a best practice in their documentation, it's something that's easy to skip over or forget to do. But for something that's not hard to do at all, it provides a lot of value when developing and maintaining your app.

Use Lifecycle Methods with care

Despite being incredibly powerful, lifecycle methods (like ComponentDidUpdate) can cause a lot of headaches to those new to React. Be careful when updating state or props within these methods, as it may cause infinite looping.

For this reason, I prefer to place lifecycle methods at the very top of a component declaration, so I can see all of that logic together when debugging.

Check out part 2 of this series, Redux Lessons for Newcomers.