Design

Lisa Margetis

UX is in the Details: Better Empty States

Dec. 15, 2017

Empty states are the in-between spaces in any app. They’re what happens when the inbox is empty, when the special offer has expired, when you haven’t selected any favorites, or when you’ve cleared the to-do list out. And potentially they are the first screens to be seen upon signing up.

hendrix empty state

Hendrix

While empty states may seem like small flourishes, they are actually a powerful design pattern.

Anticipating empty states, understanding when and where empty states occur, requires extensive knowledge of a user’s pathway through the product. By developing good empty states, the landscape of the product can be clearer - a user can know what to expect from your app and even be guided on how to use the app before they have invested time in it.

On top of improving the user experience of an app, empty states inform your users on what information will be displayed on the screen. To put it nicely, without good empty states your product will feel not just empty, but broken!

dovetail empty state

Dovetail

So now that we have our empty states accounted for, how do we make them better?

Empty states are an incredible opportunity to build brand affinity. You can introduce branded characters and animations and set the tone of the brand’s identity through empty states. It is one of the most powerful ways to set the “tone” of your product - is it silly and loose, or purposeful and stylish? We probably wouldn’t want a dog digging for a bone in a financial product, but it’s perfect for a pet adoption app.

Hoang Nguyen Empty State

Dribbble: Hoang Nguyen

Humanizing your product with enjoyable empty states can produce familiarity and build an emotional connection. Twitter didn’t just tell you they’re down with a message - they showed you the iconic Fail Whale: cute birds cheerfully lifting a huge and grinning whale.

We may be down, but here’s an awesome cartoon.

While the endearing whale is no more, the reach of that simple empty state shows how powerful a tool they can be for a brand. Instead of a cold error message, there’s a colorful little diversion from frustration. Taking the edge off of bad news with an empty state illustration is a widely-used design pattern.

Ivy Mukherjee Empty State

Dribbble: Ivy Mukherjee

So, beyond your servers crashing - what else could we use empty states for?

They can show crucial information, acting as an onboarding agent for new users.

AirBnb Itinerary Empty State

AirBnb Itinerary Empty State

They can act as a tutorial, showing a slightly more in-depth way to use a feature.

Dropbox Empty State

Dropbox Paper Empty State

They can reveal product goals, or the power of a product.

Waze Alerts Empty State

Waze Alerts Empty State

The empty states are the chance to give the product a voice and let it speak. It’s nearly an advertisement for itself!

The most common empty state is the upload screen. The drag-here box that’s unmistakable because of its design - you just want to put your latest pic there. These “contribution” empty states are vital because they’re one of the user’s direct interaction points. It must not only look like something the user wants to use, of course - it has to work perfectly, too!

Empty states are a nudge that call us to action in our apps. Without them, users aren’t just lost - they think something is wrong. If there’s no particular place for a user to go, or if they don’t like where you’re trying to take them, then they’re going to bounce!

Blank screens hide features, but empty states reveal them

As a product designer, empty states are one of my favorite chances to be creative and really get to know a product. I get to shape how a user approaches a product’s features. What should this app feel like? What will they use it for? How will they want to use it? What will signal to them: this product is secure, safe, but also simple enough to use?

Now that we’ve explored why emtpy states are so crucial - did you notice an empty state you’d never thought about? Do you have a favorite empty state? Let me know in the comments!

Lisa Margetis

What People Are Reading

Operations

8/1/16

Good Founders Make Good Clients - 5 Traits We Look For

“Ideas are easy. Implementation is hard.” – Guy Kawasaki

As a development agency that primarily works with early stage startups, we hear all kinds of business ideas. You could even say that we're in the business of building business ideas; but only one's we believe will succeed, and not on our own. We know that, without a good founder to drive implementation, even the best ideas will surely fail. In fact, most give up at the first sign of real challenge, and their ideas never see the light of day. So while we spend time evaluating the viability of the idea, we must also consider if the founder has what it takes. Here are the 5 traits we look for:

1. Tenacious belief. Some traits can be learned or honed; this is not one of them. Startups are inherently difficult, demanding, and full of unknowns and disappointment. To make it through, a founder needs confidence, determination, passion, and the like - things you can't have without first believing. We're not talking about simply believing you have a good idea. We're also not talking about blind belief to the point of delusion. This is believing strongly enough in your vision that, despite the uncertainties and inevitable struggles in your path, you will do whatever it takes to see it through.

2. Domain expertise. Serious founders need to understand their market as much as possible. Ideally, you can directly relate to the problem you're trying to solve - or - you have extensive experience that gives you insight on your target market. Even then, the best founders do everything they can to consistently learn and absorb new information.

3. Communication. The greatest entrepreneurs are masters of communication. Not all start out that way, but its something to be conscious of and constantly improve. A good founder has the ability to communicate clearly, confidently, and candidly. They can clearly explain their thoughts and ideas. They use confidence to sell themselves and their vision, as well as to lead others. They can candidly express their feelings, while maintaining control of their emotions.

4. Head in the clouds, feet on the ground. Growing a startup requires constant innovation. A good founder has vision; they dream big and consistently ask themselves, "what's next?" However, that vision will never materialize unless a founder can execute in the present. A good founder can keep their eyes to the future while practicing self awareness, focus, patience, and responsible decision making.

5. Flexibility. The survival of a business, like in nature, depends on its ability to adapt. No matter how much a founder plans, new information will arise and circumstances will change; a good founder is prepared and willing to respond. Some changes will inevitably result in failures. A founder must have the resilience to pick themselves up, learn from the failures, and push on.

6. Enjoys the ride. I know I said 5 traits, but this one's pretty important too. Yes, starting a business is difficult, risky, blah blah blah...but what's the point if you can't enjoy it? Having fun will not only make your life (feel) easier; attracting advocates, customers, employees, and investors will be easier as well.

Now these aren't the ONLY things a founder needs to build a successful business, nor do they guarantee success, but we'd bet on you. So if you have a great idea and "what it takes" (see above), we should meet.

News

10/18/17

ChangeMaker Launches!

In a world where marches and protests are making weekly headlines, people are always looking for the next cause to get behind.

But what do you do when a cause or issue you’re passionate about needs more awareness and support? How do you find people to come together? How do you organize people, activities, events, and whatever else you might need to do? And if you do find people, how do you manage all the different moving parts?

And, well, what does that have to do with us at 20spokes?

Meet ChangeMaker -- a project we recently completed and launched.

Similar to sites like Kickstarter or Indiegogo, ChangeMaker allows organizations to add a project and find fellow activists to donate to or join the cause as a volunteer. The interface provides organizations the ability to detail an issue or problem, outline a solution, and how donors or volunteers can help. When people join the project as a volunteer, they can specify their particular skillset in fields such as marketing, design, legal, or data so project managers can delegate tasks to the right people.

With funding from donations, users can work on projects for their cause by using the free website. While most project management tools have some sort of fancy, pay-to-use features, ChangeMaker is completely free to use because it is donor funded and donor maintained.

We branded, designed, and coded the ChangeMaker platform in a Rails environment. We also integrated Stripe Connect, which enables organizations to receive those donations they need to power their projects.

Putting all this together sounds like it would take a good chunk of time, right? But we kicked off this project on August 8 and launched the website this week. A little more than two months. Not too shabby, eh? Just in time for the Newfounders Conference. ChangeMaker will have a big presence at the conference with donors ready to help out organizations that have ready-to-pitch projects for its demo night. Nothing is too small or too large for ChangeMaker to help its users and organizations tackle.

Give ChangeMaker a whirl at changemaker.newfounders.us.