Design

Lisa Margetis

UX is in the Details: Better Empty States

Dec. 15, 2017

Empty states are the in-between spaces in any app. They’re what happens when the inbox is empty, when the special offer has expired, when you haven’t selected any favorites, or when you’ve cleared the to-do list out. And potentially they are the first screens to be seen upon signing up.

hendrix empty state

Hendrix

While empty states may seem like small flourishes, they are actually a powerful design pattern.

Anticipating empty states, understanding when and where empty states occur, requires extensive knowledge of a user’s pathway through the product. By developing good empty states, the landscape of the product can be clearer - a user can know what to expect from your app and even be guided on how to use the app before they have invested time in it.

On top of improving the user experience of an app, empty states inform your users on what information will be displayed on the screen. To put it nicely, without good empty states your product will feel not just empty, but broken!

dovetail empty state

Dovetail

So now that we have our empty states accounted for, how do we make them better?

Empty states are an incredible opportunity to build brand affinity. You can introduce branded characters and animations and set the tone of the brand’s identity through empty states. It is one of the most powerful ways to set the “tone” of your product - is it silly and loose, or purposeful and stylish? We probably wouldn’t want a dog digging for a bone in a financial product, but it’s perfect for a pet adoption app.

Hoang Nguyen Empty State

Dribbble: Hoang Nguyen

Humanizing your product with enjoyable empty states can produce familiarity and build an emotional connection. Twitter didn’t just tell you they’re down with a message - they showed you the iconic Fail Whale: cute birds cheerfully lifting a huge and grinning whale.

We may be down, but here’s an awesome cartoon.

While the endearing whale is no more, the reach of that simple empty state shows how powerful a tool they can be for a brand. Instead of a cold error message, there’s a colorful little diversion from frustration. Taking the edge off of bad news with an empty state illustration is a widely-used design pattern.

Ivy Mukherjee Empty State

Dribbble: Ivy Mukherjee

So, beyond your servers crashing - what else could we use empty states for?

They can show crucial information, acting as an onboarding agent for new users.

AirBnb Itinerary Empty State

AirBnb Itinerary Empty State

They can act as a tutorial, showing a slightly more in-depth way to use a feature.

Dropbox Empty State

Dropbox Paper Empty State

They can reveal product goals, or the power of a product.

Waze Alerts Empty State

Waze Alerts Empty State

The empty states are the chance to give the product a voice and let it speak. It’s nearly an advertisement for itself!

The most common empty state is the upload screen. The drag-here box that’s unmistakable because of its design - you just want to put your latest pic there. These “contribution” empty states are vital because they’re one of the user’s direct interaction points. It must not only look like something the user wants to use, of course - it has to work perfectly, too!

Empty states are a nudge that call us to action in our apps. Without them, users aren’t just lost - they think something is wrong. If there’s no particular place for a user to go, or if they don’t like where you’re trying to take them, then they’re going to bounce!

Blank screens hide features, but empty states reveal them

As a product designer, empty states are one of my favorite chances to be creative and really get to know a product. I get to shape how a user approaches a product’s features. What should this app feel like? What will they use it for? How will they want to use it? What will signal to them: this product is secure, safe, but also simple enough to use?

Now that we’ve explored why emtpy states are so crucial - did you notice an empty state you’d never thought about? Do you have a favorite empty state? Let me know in the comments!

Lisa Margetis

What People Are Reading

Technology

1/6/17

React Lessons for Newcomers

At 20spokes, developers spend a roughly equal amount of time between Ruby on Rails and React. While we enjoy working in both frameworks, they are quite different in approach, and going from a Rails way of thinking to a React way of thinking can be an adjustment.

One major way in which these frameworks are different is that Rails takes care of a lot of architectural issues that React leaves open for interpretation. Coming from a Rails background, I found the openness of React to be a bit anxiety-inducing at first, but I've come to really embrace it, because it's forced me to think more carefully than ever about how other developers would approach my code.

As a team, we've also considered what our best practices should be towards React, as we all want to make our code understandable and friendly to anyone who encounters it. To that end, below is a (growing) list of our approaches to making our React projects not only maintainable, but enjoyable to work with.

Be relentless with components

The basic building block of React is the component. To those new to React, they can best be thought of as modules.

As a developer, I start to get nervous when I see large components that perform various functions. The solution to keeping your files short and sweet is to take every opportunity to break your objects into re-useable components. Having larger components may not seem like a big deal when starting a project from scratch, but if you relentlessly component-ize you'll thank yourself as your project grows.

There are some code smells to recognize when you should create new components. If you see lots of groups of markup within a single div, those groups should probably be their own component.

If we have lots of renderXXX functions within in one component that render more markup, that's usually a code-smell that whatever is being returned from those functions should be their own component.

Make components as reusable as possible by passing dynamic data as props.

Privilege functional components over class-based ones

In many cases, it's overkill to Use React's Component class for every component you create. Not all components need access to the Lifecycle Methods or local state that Component provides. Start with stateless functional components and turn them into React Component instances as needed.

Take advantage of PropTypes

We started the practice of listing out PropTypes at the bottom of every component, so other developers can quickly reference what props are needed or optional. Oftentimes, we'd investigate what data we should expect in a component by looking up examples of that component elsewhere in the codebase. This easily can be avoided by using PropTypes, which provide a quick way to see what data is being passed, and of what type that data should be. Here's an example from our reusable Button component:

Button.propTypes = {  
  text: PropTypes.string.isRequired,
  onPress: PropTypes.func.isRequired,
  disabled: PropTypes.bool,
  icon: PropTypes.string,
}

We're pointing this out because, while Facebook already notes it as a best practice in their documentation, it's something that's easy to skip over or forget to do. But for something that's not hard to do at all, it provides a lot of value when developing and maintaining your app.

Use Lifecycle Methods with care

Despite being incredibly powerful, lifecycle methods (like ComponentDidUpdate) can cause a lot of headaches to those new to React. Be careful when updating state or props within these methods, as it may cause infinite looping.

For this reason, I prefer to place lifecycle methods at the very top of a component declaration, so I can see all of that logic together when debugging.

Check out part 2 of this series, Redux Lessons for Newcomers.

News

10/18/17

ChangeMaker Launches!

In a world where marches and protests are making weekly headlines, people are always looking for the next cause to get behind.

But what do you do when a cause or issue you’re passionate about needs more awareness and support? How do you find people to come together? How do you organize people, activities, events, and whatever else you might need to do? And if you do find people, how do you manage all the different moving parts?

And, well, what does that have to do with us at 20spokes?

Meet ChangeMaker -- a project we recently completed and launched.

Similar to sites like Kickstarter or Indiegogo, ChangeMaker allows organizations to add a project and find fellow activists to donate to or join the cause as a volunteer. The interface provides organizations the ability to detail an issue or problem, outline a solution, and how donors or volunteers can help. When people join the project as a volunteer, they can specify their particular skillset in fields such as marketing, design, legal, or data so project managers can delegate tasks to the right people.

With funding from donations, users can work on projects for their cause by using the free website. While most project management tools have some sort of fancy, pay-to-use features, ChangeMaker is completely free to use because it is donor funded and donor maintained.

We branded, designed, and coded the ChangeMaker platform in a Rails environment. We also integrated Stripe Connect, which enables organizations to receive those donations they need to power their projects.

Putting all this together sounds like it would take a good chunk of time, right? But we kicked off this project on August 8 and launched the website this week. A little more than two months. Not too shabby, eh? Just in time for the Newfounders Conference. ChangeMaker will have a big presence at the conference with donors ready to help out organizations that have ready-to-pitch projects for its demo night. Nothing is too small or too large for ChangeMaker to help its users and organizations tackle.

Give ChangeMaker a whirl at changemaker.newfounders.us.